11 Sep 2018

A Scrum Course

Submitted by croga
In the early 20th century, Alfred Kroeber wrote about patterns in Anthropology; the structures that make up our culture. Several years later, Christopher Alexander took those same concepts into Architecture and described the patterns we find that make beautiful cities, buildings, rooms. For the past several years, big names in Scrum have been coming together to talk about the patterns of Scrum; How Scrum works, why it works and how to implement it, using patterns. This group of people have several person-centuries of combined experience with Scrum.
01 Mar 2016

Thumb Wars

Submitted by croga

At the Philips / Rally SAFe event earlier this year, a slightly adapted version of Thumb Wars was used as a small energizer. But there's more to it than meets the eye.....

21 Feb 2016

Agile in a non-agile environment

Submitted by croga
A couple of weeks ago, a friend of mine asked me to talk to his sister. This sister has her own company teaching Project Management (sorry, gross generalisation but bear with me). She mostly specialises in non-IT projects using information from Prince2, Lean and other platforms. A lot of the time, though, there are IT components in the projects and programs running in the companies she works for. And lately that means she meets Agile practices on her way. She wanted to know more about Agile in general and so we sat down for a talk. As some of you may know, my main life goal is Agile World Domination. Any time I can talk to any professional about Agile and what it can do for them, I take that opportunity to further my ominous life goal. The original intent was to see what we can do for each other. We talked about my work, her work, where those two touch and what we can add to each others understanding of the world. At one point she said “The biggest issue I face is with companies that use classic Portfolio Management. How does Agile fit there?”
21 Feb 2016

Self forming teams

Submitted by croga
Last week a friend of mine told me a story that I wanted to share with the rest of the world. A couple of years ago he was working as a line manager. Together with a colleague he managed a group of about 25 people, consisting of two teams. Each team was responsible for their own domain. Expectation planning forecast that one of the domains would be receiving less work in the future, whilst other domains were destined for a higher volume of work and would require a heightened focus. The team dynamics would need to change.
04 Dec 2015

Delegation Poker

Submitted by croga
In the transformation process to a modern organisation, one of our managers finds it hard to let go of his tasks and responsibilities. He wants to, but he doesn't really know how to. His own transformation is that of the Operations Manager to Product Owner of our main product.
30 Oct 2015

Project Management and SCRUM

Submitted by croga
Lately I've seen SCRUM implementations where a project has a Project Manager, a Product Owner and a SCRUM team. In my opinion, SCRUM should never have a Project Manager. The role does not fit in the architecture of a SCRUM process. Not only because SCRUM is unsuitable for projects (SCRUM does not recognise projects, only products that are in a state of perpetual change) but also because all tasks attributed to the role are assigned already within SCRUM.
10 Aug 2015

A suprising truth about Loneliness

Submitted by croga

During my Management3.0 course last week, there was a lot of talk about ideal team sizes, ideal company sizes, etc. That then evolved into a discussion on psychological events, group structures, how do we interact with people?
Nadezhda pointed us to "The Innovation of Loneliness". A internet video about how online social networks are replacing personal interaction and reshaping our self image to the point that it might become the biggest social problem humanity is yet to face.

05 Jun 2015

Agile beyond Software Development

Submitted by croga

And then I ran into this article: http://pragdave.me/blog/2014/03/04/time-to-kill-agile/
Dave Thomas argues that "Agile software development" is little more than "drop most processes, think about the impact of what you do NOW on what you're going to do NEXT". And isn't that exactly what needs to be done in the rest of the company as well? Wouldn't all work be done more efficiently if we projected the Agile Manifesto on it?

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